Okami: single player games are still relevant

Normally I would do reviews on my website, but considering the fact I’m out of the country and don’t have access to the main site as a whole, talking about the game on here for now will have to do. A proper review will appear on my website at a later date.

So then, Okami. Originally released on the PS2 in 2006, published by Capcom and developed by Clover Studios, and then re-released on the Wii in 2008 (because who doesn’t want to use the Wiimote to draw lines and circles?) … and then released on the PS3 in 2012 and then released again on the PS4, the PC and the Xbox in the ass end of 2017, you could say that this game has seen a lot of releases.

More impressive still is that the game was developed by Clover Studios, who went defunct in 2007 and were dissolved into Capcom overall. So the developing studio wasn’t even around to re-release their game as many times as it was released, or at least, not in their original form as developers. So how does a game – whose developers went under – see so many releases over a span of eleven years?

Probably because it’s a damn good game.

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The PewDiePie Problem

Once again, the “face of YouTube” PewDiePie has found himself in hot water – and once again we have a throng of people ready to rip out his proverbial throat and a throng of people ready to defend him to the grave, and seemingly very few people understanding the actual issues that are coming about as a result of this.

I’ll be very clear: I don’t like PewDiePie’s brand of humour. I did, however, used to watch some of his videos when I was younger, as the style of humour appealed to me more then than it does now. Felix – his actual name, for those unsure of who I’m talking about – would probably do well to keep this in mind in the future. Because you see, the problem with Felix calling somebody a “nigger” on his PUBG livestream is not, in fact, that he called somebody playing a pixel avatar a nigger. And I’d like to dub this the “PewDiePie Problem” because, frankly, he’s the biggest face of this problem that we actually have.

So caught up in the problem at face-value – with the virtuous warriors of self-imposed social justice feeling the need to demonise Felix for being a racist in their eyes, and the mass of people thinking that their favourite YouTuber has done nothing wrong and most certainly isn’t a racist for his actions – nobody seems to be focusing on what this means in the bigger picture, here. And that bigger picture is a lot bigger than anybody seems to give it credit for.

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